Graphic designer whose career was ruined after Martin Bashir scandal is pegged at £ 1million

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The graphic designer whose career was ruined after exposing the Martin Bashir scandal is set at £ 1million from the BBC (funded by viewer license fees, of course)

  • CEO Tim Davie to meet with whistleblower Matt Wiessler on Thursday
  • Sources claim Mr Wiessler could receive a payment of £ 1million from the company
  • Martin Bashir asked graphic designer to fake fake bank statements

The BBC risks paying up to £ 1 million in compensation to the graphic designer whose career was wiped out after exposing the Martin Bashir scandal.

The Mail on Sunday can reveal CEO Tim Davie will meet Matt Wiessler on Thursday and personally apologize for the way he was kicked out of the company after sounding the alarm over disgraced Bashir interview in 1995 with Princess Diana.

Mr Wiessler was asked by Bashir to fake fake bank statements, which the reporter then showed Diana’s brother Earl Spencer as part of his attempt to get Panorama’s explosive interview.

BBC lawyers to discuss compensation for Matt Wiessler (pictured) for his loss of earnings at this week’s meeting

Mr. Wiessler later approached the bosses because he feared he had unwittingly played a role in obtaining the interview by deception.

But instead of praising him for whistling, 1996 documents released last year revealed how Tony Hall, then news chief and future CEO, blacklisted him for not working for the Company.

Lord Hall told then BBC Managing Director Lord Birt: “We are taking steps to ensure that the graphic designer involved – Matthew Wiessler – will no longer work for the BBC (when a current contract expires in the next weeks).”

The Defense Department understands that lawyers for the BBC will discuss compensation for Mr Wiessler for his loss of earnings at this week’s meeting.

Sources said last night the company’s payout could reach £ 1million.

“He has always asked for a clear apology from the BBC and it has not been received to date,” a close friend said.

“He really hopes that Thursday’s meeting will at least result in an apology and perhaps move his compensation claim forward.”

Mr Wiessler was an award-winning star in the BBC graphics department who helped design the graphics for the BBC election night cover in 1992 when he was still in his twenties. He worked with presenters Peter Snow and David Dimbleby to reinvent the so-called “swingometer” used in general election coverage.

CEO Tim Davie to meet with Matt Wiessler on Thursday ahead of possible payout

General manager Tim Davie to meet with Matt Wiessler on Thursday ahead of possible payout

“Matt was one of the best television designers of the day,” his friend said.

“An important part of communicating the facts to people was the use of graphics, especially in news programs like Panorama. It was a very special skill and he was recognized by everyone as one of the best.

Last week Mr Davie admitted he was “shocked” by the way Mr Wiessler and other whistleblowers had been treated.

He said: “The very person who raised this – and I know many staff members are very attached to this – the very person who raised this issue has suffered tremendous impacts, for which we are very sorry. “

When asked if he thought the BBC owed the designer pay, Davie said it had to go through a “legal discussion”.

He added: “ We are going to initiate this discussion because we were clearly at fault. ”

A report by former Supreme Court Justice Lord Dyson earlier this month concluded that Bashir had engaged in a

A report by former Supreme Court Justice Lord Dyson earlier this month concluded that Bashir had engaged in “deceptive behavior” by ordering the fake bank statements prior to Diana’s interview.

Three other former Panorama journalists – Tom Mangold, Mark Killick and Harry Dean – who approached program editor Steve Hewlett to share their concerns about Bashir may also seek compensation.

Writing in last weekend’s MoS, Mr Mangold said he “did badly” after voicing his concerns, adding: “I was ‘let go’ and a BBC shamed me. paid peanuts as compensation “.

A devastating report by former Supreme Court Justice Lord Dyson earlier this month concluded that Bashir had engaged in “deceptive behavior” by ordering the fake bank statements and accused Hall of overseeing an internal investigation ” terribly ineffective “on the matter.

Lord Dyson praised Mr Wiessler, who is now part-owner of a bicycle design company in Devon, for acting “responsibly and appropriately” in denouncing and said “no one has criticized him for accepting the commission “to make fun of bank statements

The BBC said last night it was unable to comment.

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